Taking Out the Trash

Rachel had renters that trashed her property. The damage cost was above the amount of the deposit. She can send the damages to collections. Is it a good idea to pursue it, or should she chalk it up to stupid tax?

QUESTION: Rachel in Denver had renters that trashed her property. Rachel withheld the deposit, but the damage cost was above the amount of the deposit. She has the option to send the damages to collections. Is it a good idea to pursue it, or should she chalk it up to stupid tax?

ANSWER: I think if you were going to go after someone who damaged your property, you should have done it immediately when they moved out. If they did all that, you don’t wait a year to go after them. You may not have lost your legal footing to do that, but you lost your moral footing.

Tell the people they have torn up your home and it’s an extra $2,000 above the deposit to do the repairs. They are responsible for that. You notify them of that. Tell them they have X number of days to provide the $2,000 or you’ll have to go to court and get the judge to make them give you the $2,000 because they tore up your house.

The problem is that you didn’t do that, so both you and they let it sit for a year. I think both of you should just forget it and walk away. But if you want to go there, there’s nothing wrong with asking someone to fix something of yours that they tore up, but you don’t do it a year later.

I don’t know where the property manager gets this; it doesn’t make any sense to me. This should teach you that this property manager isn’t very good. They are coming back to this a year later, which proves they are not any good. They aren’t any good because they let this crud go on in your house.

They were supposed to be doing investigations, and you are supposed to visit a home that you own and visually inspect it. We visually inspect ours once a quarter. You have to inspect what you expect in property management, just like anything else.