Don't Pay A Premium For Law School

Julie applied to law school and was admitted to a summer program. She can't get any grants or loans for it and doesn't know how to pay for it. Dave suggests looking for another law school.

QUESTION: Julie in Texas applied to law school and didn’t get directly admitted but was admitted to a summer program. She can’t get any grants or loans for it and doesn’t know how to pay for it. It’s going to be about $8,000, and she doesn’t have that much in savings. Dave suggests looking for another law school.

ANSWER: Why pay an $8,000 premium to go to this certain school? I think you can get into one legitimately if you can get into this one with the $8,000 premium. I personally would just go apply to some other places. I know it’s hard to get into law school. I know you won’t get into every place you apply for. I understand that. I’m not naïve. The point is that I wouldn’t pay an $8,000 premium to go to a certain school. Instead, I would find a different school to attend, find a different way to get my law degree. It just sounds like they’ve kind of got you over a barrel and they’re sticking you a little bit.

I think if I were going to spend money, I’d probably spend more on a different better class that has a better track record, with other people that you check out and do your due diligence on to get your LSAT score up, and avoid the $8,000.

I just can’t visualize paying the $8,000 just to get in. I really can’t. You’ve got to assess it and decide if that’s your only way to go and how you’re going to pay for law school going forward. The problem with going deeply into debt to go to law school is that not everyone graduates from law school. Then you get yourself into a real mess because you don’t have the law degree and you do have the debt. That is really scary stuff.