Money Can Be a Scorecard

Russ asks how to balance the incentive of making more money versus staying where he's at. Dave says it's a good thing to be able to measure when you're winning or losing.

QUESTION: Russ on Facebook asks how to balance the incentive of making more money versus staying where he’s at. Russ worries that it makes him seem greedy. Dave says more money usually means you’re doing more work, and it’s a good thing to be able to measure when you’re winning or losing.

ANSWER: It could be healthy, and it could be greedy. It’s greedy if it’s all-consuming. It’s healthy if you’re using pay as a scorecard.

I like to make more because it means I’m doing more. I use it as a method of measuring the traction I’m getting in the marketplace. I don’t need more money, so I’m not greedy. And I like to make more so I can give more, so I know I’m not greedy. I like to make more so I can invest more so I can more permanently change my entire family tree. It’s not about me. It’s not about greed. I don’t get a spiritual high from money or anything like that. I used to, but I grew out of that.

You’ve got to do a heart check—a self-check—on that and say, “Where am I on that?” But if it’s just you measuring traction and you feel like you’re spinning your wheels here, that you’re not moving the needle and you’re not getting appreciated, then I’m great with people who want to work on incentive or commission or whatever you call it—whatever the method of calculation is. It’s a good thing to be able to measure when you’re losing. It’s a good thing to be able to measure when you’re winning. I don’t think that’s greed necessarily in that desire. It could be—probably is the way you worded it—a healthy desire.