Give It A One-Two Punch

Mark is a landscape architect and planner, and he wants to reset his career in a different direction. What's the best way to do that? Dave doesn't think anything is holding him down.

QUESTION: Mark in Minneapolis was laid off 18 months ago. He’s a landscape architect and planner, and he wants to reset his career in a different direction. What’s the best way to do that? Dave doesn’t think anything is holding him down.

ANSWER: I’m a firm believer in figuring out as best you can what you love doing, and what you’re gifted at is usually what you love doing. Sometimes people do things they’re gifted at in places and in ways that aren’t fun. I’m most alive when I’m teaching, whether it’s here on the air, on stage, writing, whatever it is, I’m somehow moving someone to transform their lives. I know that about me. That’s where I’m best. I know the things that I’m least alive when I’m doing them. I try to figure out stuff to where I’m using my strengths but also doing it in intelligent ways so we’re able to monetize it and feed the family. So what is it that even if they didn’t pay you, you love it so much you’d do it anyway?

It sounds like you’ve got a huge opportunity to go into the market self-employed.

I like the idea of you relocating to Texas. There’s nothing holding you in Minneapolis. If you’re going to start fresh, you might as well start fresh and, like you say, the Texas economy in general is doing well. There are certainly pockets and exceptions and that kind of thing, but it is anything but bleak comparatively speaking. I think that’s a good move.

I think the bottom line to the discussion is how do you do that? I think you find something you love doing where you get up, and even the days that are frustrating are better than the days when you worked at another place.

Easing into something else would at least give you the ability to pay your bills while you’re getting something started. That’s not a bad thing at all. I’ll send you a copy of EntreLeadership, which is the small business and business leadership book. Put that with Quitter, and then you’ve got a one-two punch, if you will, to decide how to open and when to open if to open.