Don't Give A Flighty Explanation

Bill is looking to make a change, but how does he convince an employer he's a good hire even though he's been known to quit jobs prematurely in the past?

QUESTION: Bill in Wyoming has been in his current job for five years and has had a second job for three years. He’s looking to make a change, but how does he convince an employer he’s a good hire even though he’s been known to quit jobs prematurely in the past?

ANSWER: Quitting a job after a month is not a sin that keeps you from getting hired. It might with some corporate goob who’s looking at things through some kind of hiring paradigm that they have or hiring process that they have. If you’re interviewing with us here, for instance, we would look at that. We’d want to hear what your explanation was, and if your explanation makes you sound flighty, then we’re going to worry about that. But what is the explanation, and why won’t that happen here? If everything else lines up and looks good, the fact that you quit a job after one month is not a deal killer for us. I’m guessing that it’s one of the other things that they’re looking at. That’s probably cutting you off.

My guess is that the fields you’re interested in are like most. Not in a negative way, but in a positive way, it is who you know. By that, what I mean is I would try to work to develop relationships with people who work in those fields. They can then give you a positive reference. Out of the people we hire here, and we hire 35–50 people a year depending on what year it is and what’s going on, the vast majority of them—75% or more—are people referred by someone who already works here. Knowing someone gets you through the résumé pile. It helps you pierce through the mess to get to clarity.

The Power of WHO! is the book I’d pick up by Bob Beaudine.