Dramatic Decision-Making

Lee Ann and her husband need to replace a rotting back door. It will be a $10,000 home improvement project to repair and protect the house from rotting. Where do they find the money for this?

QUESTION: Lee Ann in Atlanta is calling because she and her husband need to replace a rotting back door. It will be a $10,000 home improvement project to repair and protect the house from rotting. Where do they find the money for this?

ANSWER: Number one, most of the time, a deck that’s out in the rain doesn’t rot. They’re made to be out in the rain. Then number two, I’m confused about how that caused your back door to rot.

Let me tell you why I’m poking at this. It sounds really fishy. It sounds like you’re trying to get a covered porch—that you want a covered porch—and you figured out a way to make this rotting thing the way to do it.

You’ve obviously got a rain leak. I don’t have any question about that, but most people have exterior doors, and many of them don’t have covered porches and their exterior doors don’t leak and don’t rot. You don’t necessarily have to have a covered porch to fix the back door. That’s all I’m challenging here. You went from a bad back door to a $10,000 home improvement.

Now if you want to stop paying down on the house and build yourself a little sunroom back there, that’s fine. But let’s be sure that we, in our decision-making process, don’t create drama to get something that we actually want that’s not really needed to fix the problem. And I do a lot of real estate deals, and the first thing I would be thinking about doing here is just fixing the back door where it didn’t freaking leak. That’s a lot less than $10,000, and no, you don’t have to have a porch over every door in your home to keep doors from leaking. That’s weird. I mean, somebody’s not building a door right. Lots people have doors that don’t have porches over them that don’t leak—like everybody listening to this broadcast, as an example.

That’s my point. But if you want to stop, you’re in good shape. You’re making money. You’re doing fine. If you want to stop what you’re doing and spend $10,000 on your house and slow down your getting out of debt because you want to build something, build something. I’m okay with that. That part’s okay. I just don’t go along with decision-making based on drama. That’s a bad plan because it always leads you in other decisions that you do—it leads you to places that just are not fun at all. This one’s okay though as long as you pay cash for it. Of course, you’re going to pay cash. I know you are. I just know you are. I’m sure of it.